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Get your fill of Sourdough

Yodeling cowboy Sourdough Slim returns to Loomis
By: Martha Garcia, Loomis News Editor
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For an evening of fun and laughter, don’t miss the return Loomis performance by Sourdough Slim on Saturday, March 21, at the Blue Goose Fruit Shed. Rick Crowder, in the persona of Sourdough Slim, puts on a lively, fast-paced show chock-full of musical entertainment. Sourdough is a one-man band, combining his classic western songs and comedy with an amazing yodeling talent. And throughout the evening, he accompanies himself on the guitar, ukulele and harmonica, often while executing complicated roping tricks. Sourdough has been a favorite at the Fall Gathering of Cowboy Poetry and Music in the past, and last year Bert Braun of The Cowpoke Productions invited Sourdough to put on a one-man show. He ended up yodeling his way into the hearts of the sold-out crowd that night at the Loomis theater. Terry Duarte, of Penryn, remembers last year’s show as “incredible” and “full of gut-wrenching laughter.” Duarte also said she’s “never laughed so hard in my life,” especially at clean humor. Sourdough puts on entertainment that can be enjoyed by the entire family, which is why John Gant, of Loomis, took his granddaughter Robyn Gillum to last year’s show. “It has a lot of variety. My youngest granddaughter really enjoyed it,” Gant said. That granddaughter is Robyn Gillum, 13, a Placer Elementary School seventh-grader, who was impressed by Sourdough’s funny stories. She also remembers his songs, “because they told of his life as a cowboy,” she said. Sourdough is a nationally known talent who is a regular performer at the National Cowboy Gathering in Elko, Nev. He has also played the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. and the Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall in New York. Tickets for the Sourdough Slim show, which begins 7 p.m., are $20 each and can be purchased at Blue Goose Produce and Foothill Feed & Gifts or by calling 787-0878. Refreshments will be served by the South Placer Heritage Foundation, the non-profit organization that owns and runs the renovated fruit-packing shed. The Heritage Foundation will apply proceeds from the evening toward expenses incurred in installation of the new roof, which was completed last year, said Randy Elder, the foundation’s president.